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Multi-threaded SQLite without the OperationalErrors

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SQLite's write lock and pysqlite's clunky transaction state-machine are a toxic combination for multi-threaded applications. Unless you are very diligent about keeping your write transactions as short as possible, you can easily wind up with one thread accidentally holding a write transaction open for an unnecessarily long time. Threads that are waiting to write will then have a much greater likelihood of timing out while waiting for the lock, giving the illusion of poor performance.

In this post I'd like to share a very effective technique for performing writes to a SQLite database from multiple threads.

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Monospace Font Favorites

For the past six months or so, I've been experimenting with a variety of monospace fonts in a quest to find the perfect coding font. While I haven't found a clear winner, I have found a dozen nice-looking fonts and learned a lot about typefaces in general. I've also learned quite a bit about font rendering on Linux, which I hope to summarize in a separate post soon.

In this post I'd like to share some screenshots (or "swatches") of my favorite fonts.

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Suffering for fashion: a glimpse into my Linux theming toolchain

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My desktop at the time of writing.

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Here it is a couple months later.

It's been over 2 years since I wrote about the tooling I use to theme my desktop, so I thought I'd post about my current scripts...

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"For Humans" makes me cringe

for chodes

When Kenneth Reitz created the requests library, the Python community rushed to embrace the project, as it provided (finally) a clean, sane API for making HTTP requests. He subtitled his project "Python HTTP Requests for Humans", referring, I suppose, to the fact that his API provided developer-friendly APIs. If naming things "for humans" had stopped there, that would have been fine with me, but instead there's been a steady stream of new projects describing themselves as being "For Humans" and I have issues with that.

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Measuring Nginx Cache Performance using Lua and Redis

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Shortly after launching my Nginx-based cache + thumbnailing web-service, I realized I had no visibility into the performance of the service. I was curious what my hit-ratios were like, how much time was spent during a cache-miss, basic stuff like that. Nginx has monitoring tools, but it looks like they're only available to people who pay for Nginx Plus, so I decided to see if I could roll my own. In this post, I'll describe how I used Lua, cosockets, and Redis to extract real-time metrics from my thumbnail service.

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Nginx: a caching, thumbnailing, reverse proxying image server?

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A month or two ago, I decided to remove Varnish from my site and replace it with Nginx's built-in caching system. I was already using Nginx to proxy to my Python sites, so getting rid of Varnish meant one less thing to fiddle with. I spent a few days reading up on how to configure Nginx's cache and overhauling the various config files for my Python sites (so much for saving time). In the course of my reading I bookmarked a number of interesting Nginx modules to return to, among them the Image Filter module.

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Five reasons you should use SQLite in 2016

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If you haven't heard, SQLite is an amazing database capable of doing real work in real production environments. In this post, I'll outline 5 reasons why I think you should use SQLite in 2016.

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Announcing sophy: fast Python bindings for Sophia Database

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Sophia is a powerful key/value database with loads of features packed into a simple C API. In order to use this database in some upcoming projects I've got planned, I decided to write some Python bindings and the result is sophy. In this post, I'll describe the features of Sophia database, and then show example code using sophy, the Python wrapper.

Here is an overview of the features of the Sophia database:

  • Append-only MVCC database
  • ACID transactions
  • Consistent cursors
  • Compression
  • Ordered key/value store
  • Range searches
  • Prefix searches

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SQLite Table-Valued Functions with Python

One of the benefits of running an embedded database like SQLite is that you can configure SQLite to call into your application's code. SQLite provides APIs that allow you to create your own scalar functions, aggregate functions, collations, and even your own virtual tables. In this post I'll describe how I used the virtual table APIs to expose a nice API for creating table-valued (or, multi-value) functions in Python. The project is called sqlite-vtfunc and is hosted on GitHub.

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Using SQLite4's LSM Storage Engine as a Stand-alone NoSQL Database with Python

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SQLite and Key/Value databases are two of my favorite topics to blog about. Today I get to write about both, because in this post I will be demonstrating a Python wrapper for SQLite4's log-structured merge-tree (LSM) key/value store.

I don't actively follow SQLite's releases, but the recent release of SQLite 3.8.11 drew quite a bit of attention as the release notes described massive performance improvements over 3.8.0. While reading the release notes I happened to see a blurb about a new, experimental full-text search extension (which I wrote about in a different post), and all this got me to wondering what was going on with SQLite4.

As I was reading about SQLite4, I saw that one of the design goals was to provide an interface for pluggable storage engines. At the time I'm writing this, SQLite4 has two built-in storage backends, one of which is an LSM key/value store. Over the past month or two I've been having fun with Cython, writing Python wrappers for the embedded key/value stores UnQLite and Vedis. I figured it would be cool to use Cython to write a Python interface for SQLite4's LSM storage engine.

After pulling down the SQLite4 source code and reading through the LSM header file (it's very small!), I started coding and the result is python-lsm-db (docs).

Read the rest of the post for examples of how to use the library.

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