Entries tagged with python

Multi-threaded SQLite without the OperationalErrors

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SQLite's write lock and pysqlite's clunky transaction state-machine are a toxic combination for multi-threaded applications. Unless you are very diligent about keeping your write transactions as short as possible, you can easily wind up with one thread accidentally holding a write transaction open for an unnecessarily long time. Threads that are waiting to write will then have a much greater likelihood of timing out while waiting for the lock, giving the illusion of poor performance.

In this post I'd like to share a very effective technique for performing writes to a SQLite database from multiple threads.

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Suffering for fashion: a glimpse into my Linux theming toolchain

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My desktop at the time of writing.

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Here it is a couple months later.

It's been over 2 years since I wrote about the tooling I use to theme my desktop, so I thought I'd post about my current scripts...

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"For Humans" makes me cringe

for chodes

When Kenneth Reitz created the requests library, the Python community rushed to embrace the project, as it provided (finally) a clean, sane API for making HTTP requests. He subtitled his project "Python HTTP Requests for Humans", referring, I suppose, to the fact that his API provided developer-friendly APIs. If naming things "for humans" had stopped there, that would have been fine with me, but instead there's been a steady stream of new projects describing themselves as being "For Humans" and I have issues with that.

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Five reasons you should use SQLite in 2016

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If you haven't heard, SQLite is an amazing database capable of doing real work in real production environments. In this post, I'll outline 5 reasons why I think you should use SQLite in 2016.

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Announcing sophy: fast Python bindings for Sophia Database

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Sophia is a powerful key/value database with loads of features packed into a simple C API. In order to use this database in some upcoming projects I've got planned, I decided to write some Python bindings and the result is sophy. In this post, I'll describe the features of Sophia database, and then show example code using sophy, the Python wrapper.

Here is an overview of the features of the Sophia database:

  • Append-only MVCC database
  • ACID transactions
  • Consistent cursors
  • Compression
  • Ordered key/value store
  • Range searches
  • Prefix searches

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SQLite Table-Valued Functions with Python

One of the benefits of running an embedded database like SQLite is that you can configure SQLite to call into your application's code. SQLite provides APIs that allow you to create your own scalar functions, aggregate functions, collations, and even your own virtual tables. In this post I'll describe how I used the virtual table APIs to expose a nice API for creating table-valued (or, multi-value) functions in Python. The project is called sqlite-vtfunc and is hosted on GitHub.

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Using SQLite4's LSM Storage Engine as a Stand-alone NoSQL Database with Python

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SQLite and Key/Value databases are two of my favorite topics to blog about. Today I get to write about both, because in this post I will be demonstrating a Python wrapper for SQLite4's log-structured merge-tree (LSM) key/value store.

I don't actively follow SQLite's releases, but the recent release of SQLite 3.8.11 drew quite a bit of attention as the release notes described massive performance improvements over 3.8.0. While reading the release notes I happened to see a blurb about a new, experimental full-text search extension (which I wrote about in a different post), and all this got me to wondering what was going on with SQLite4.

As I was reading about SQLite4, I saw that one of the design goals was to provide an interface for pluggable storage engines. At the time I'm writing this, SQLite4 has two built-in storage backends, one of which is an LSM key/value store. Over the past month or two I've been having fun with Cython, writing Python wrappers for the embedded key/value stores UnQLite and Vedis. I figured it would be cool to use Cython to write a Python interface for SQLite4's LSM storage engine.

After pulling down the SQLite4 source code and reading through the LSM header file (it's very small!), I started coding and the result is python-lsm-db (docs).

Read the rest of the post for examples of how to use the library.

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A Tour of Tagging Schemas: Many-to-many, Bitmaps and More

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In this post I'll describe how to implement tagging with a relational database. What I mean by tagging are those little labels you see at the top of this blog post, which indicate how I've chosen to categorize the content. There are many ways to solve this problem, and I'll try to describe some of the more popular methods, as well as one unconventional approach using bitmaps. In each section I'll describe the database schema, try to list the benefits and drawbacks, and present example queries. I will use Peewee ORM for the example code, but hopefully these examples will easily translate to your tool-of-choice.

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Meet Scout, a Search Server Powered by SQLite

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In my continuing adventures with SQLite, I had the idea of writing a RESTful search server utilizing SQLite's full-text search extension. You might think of it as a poor man's ElasticSearch – a very, very poor man.

So what is this project? Well, the idea I had was that instead of building out separate search implementations for my various projects, I would build a single lightweight search service I could use everywhere. I really like SQLite (and have previously blogged about using SQLite's full-text search with Python), and the full-text search extension is quite good, so it didn't require much imagination to take the next leap and expose it as a web-service.

Read on for more details.

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How to make a Flask blog in one hour or less

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For fun, I thought I'd write a post describing how to build a blog using Flask, a Python web-framework. Building a blog seems like, along with writing a Twitter-clone, a quintessential experience when learning a new web framework. I remember when I was attending a five-day Django tutorial presented by Jacob Kaplan-Moss, one of my favorite projects we did was creating a blog. After setting up the core of the site, I spent a ton of time adding features and little tweaks here-and-there. My hope is that this post will give you the tools to build a blog, and that you have fun customizing the site and adding cool new features.

In this post we'll cover the basics to get a functional site, but leave lots of room for personalization and improvements so you can make it your own. The actual Python source code for the blog will be a very manageable 200 lines.

Who is this post for?

This post is intended for beginner to intermediate-level Python developers, or experienced developers looking to learn a bit more about Python and Flask. For the mother of all Flask tutorials, check out Miguel Grinberg's 18 part Flask mega-tutorial.

The spec

Here are the features:

  • Entries are formatted using markdown.
  • Entries support syntax highlighting, optionally using Github-style triple-backticks.
  • Automatic video / rich media embedding using OEmbed.
  • Very nice full-text search thanks to SQLite's FTS extension.
  • Pagination.
  • Draft posts.

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