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Announcing sophy: fast Python bindings for Sophia Database

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Sophia is a powerful key/value database with loads of features packed into a simple C API. In order to use this database in some upcoming projects I've got planned, I decided to write some Python bindings and the result is sophy. In this post, I'll describe the features of Sophia database, and then show example code using sophy, the Python wrapper.

Here is an overview of the features of the Sophia database:

  • Append-only MVCC database
  • ACID transactions
  • Consistent cursors
  • Compression
  • Ordered key/value store
  • Range searches
  • Prefix searches

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Updated instructions for compiling BerkeleyDB with SQLite for use with Python

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About three years ago I posted some instructions for building the Python SQLite driver for use with BerkeleyDB. While those instructions still work, they have the unfortunate consequence of stomping on any other SQLite builds you've installed in /usr/local. I haven't been able to build pysqlite with BerkeleyDB compiled in, because the source amalgamation generated by BerkeleyDB is invalid. So that leaves us with dynamically linking, and that requires that we use the BerkeleyDB libsqlite, which is exactly what the previous post described.

In this post I'll describe a better approach. Instead of building a modified version of libsqlite3, we'll modify pysqlite to use the BerkeleyDB libdb_sql library.

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SQLite Spellfix Extension and Python

The SQLite source tree is full of wonders. There is the the lemon parser generator, a btree implementation (well, kind of not surprising), multiple search engines, a json library, and more. It looks like Dr. Hipp is also experimenting with integrating the LSM key/value store from SQLite4 as a standalone virtual table.

I've written about the json and full-text search extensions, the lsm key/value store, and the transitive closure extension (useful when querying hierarchical data). In this post I'll be covering another interesting extension, the spellfix1 extension (documentation).

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SQLite Table-Valued Functions with Python

One of the benefits of running an embedded database like SQLite is that you can configure SQLite to call into your application's code. SQLite provides APIs that allow you to create your own scalar functions, aggregate functions, collations, and even your own virtual tables. In this post I'll describe how I used the virtual table APIs to expose a nice API for creating table-valued (or, multi-value) functions in Python. The project is called sqlite-vtfunc and is hosted on GitHub.

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Advanced filtering and SQLite FTS5 with Scout search engine

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I've been working on some new features for Scout and thought they might be worth a short blog post. The super-short version is that Scout now supports complex filtering on metadata, adding another layer of filtering besides the full-text search. Additionally, I've added support for SQLite FTS5, using it by default if it's available otherwise falling back to FTS4.

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Using the SQLite JSON1 and FTS5 Extensions with Python

Back in September, word started getting around trendy programming circles about a new file that had appeared in the SQLite fossil repo named json1.c. I originally wrote up a post that contained some gross hacks in order to get pysqlite to compile and work with the new json1 extension. With the release of SQLite 3.9.0, those hacks are no longer necessary.

SQLite 3.9.0 is a fantastic release. In addition to the much anticipated json1 extension, there is a new version of the full-text search extension called fts5. fts5 improves performance of complex search queries and provides an out-of-the-box BM25 ranking implementation. You can also boost the significance of particular fields in the ranking. I suggest you check out the release notes for the full list of enhancements

This post will describe how to compile SQLite with support for json1 and fts5. We'll use the new SQLite library to compile a python driver so we can use the new features from python. Because I really like pysqlite and apsw, I've included instructions for building both of them. Finally, we'll use peewee ORM to run queries using the json1 and fts5 extensions.

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My List of Python and SQLite Resources

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This post is going to be a greatest hits of my open-source libraries and blog posts concerning the use of SQLite with Python. I'll also share a list of some other neat SQLite projects that you may not have heard of before.

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Using SQLite4's LSM Storage Engine as a Stand-alone NoSQL Database with Python

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SQLite and Key/Value databases are two of my favorite topics to blog about. Today I get to write about both, because in this post I will be demonstrating a Python wrapper for SQLite4's log-structured merge-tree (LSM) key/value store.

I don't actively follow SQLite's releases, but the recent release of SQLite 3.8.11 drew quite a bit of attention as the release notes described massive performance improvements over 3.8.0. While reading the release notes I happened to see a blurb about a new, experimental full-text search extension (which I wrote about in a different post), and all this got me to wondering what was going on with SQLite4.

As I was reading about SQLite4, I saw that one of the design goals was to provide an interface for pluggable storage engines. At the time I'm writing this, SQLite4 has two built-in storage backends, one of which is an LSM key/value store. Over the past month or two I've been having fun with Cython, writing Python wrappers for the embedded key/value stores UnQLite and Vedis. I figured it would be cool to use Cython to write a Python interface for SQLite4's LSM storage engine.

After pulling down the SQLite4 source code and reading through the LSM header file (it's very small!), I started coding and the result is python-lsm-db (docs).

Read the rest of the post for examples of how to use the library.

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Building the SQLite FTS5 Search Extension

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SQLite 3.8.11.1 contains a new, experimental version of the full-text search extension named FTS5. Reviewing the documentation for FTS5, I saw that it includes a couple cool enhancements, namely a more sophisticated query language, and built-in BM25 result ranking.

I decided to give it a try and thought I'd share my notes on compiling the extension in case anyone else is curious.

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Introduction to the fast new UnQLite Python Bindings

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About a year ago, I blogged about some Python bindings I wrote for the embedded NoSQL document store UnQLite. One year later I'm happy to announce that I've rewritten the library using Cython and operations are, in most cases, an order of magnitude faster.

This was my first real attempt at using Cython and the experience was just the right mix of challenging and rewarding. I bought the O'Reilly Cython Book which came in super handy, so if you're interested in getting started with Cython I recommend picking up a copy.

In this post I'll quickly touch on the features of UnQLite, then show you how to use the Python bindings. When you're done reading you should hopefully be ready to use UnQLite in your next Python project.

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